Pet Conditions

Pet Health Conditions

Pet Health Conditions

Dealing with your pet’s health problems can be stressful. Understanding certain health conditions your pet might be facing can help bring you one step closer towards nutritionally managing the condition.

Dog Conditions

Dog Conditions

Arthritis

It is estimated that canine arthritis affects as many as one in five dogs adult dogs1. Changes in the joint may occur even before the clinical signs of osteoarthritis are seen.  Contact your veterinarian if you notice any of the following changes:

  • Stiffness
  • Lameness
  • Reduced mobility

1. Blackwell’s Five-Minute Veterinary Consult: Canine and Feline. Fifth Edition 2011: 110

Ask your veterinarian about Purina® Pro Plan® Veterinary Diets

Colitis

Colitis is an inflammation of the colon, part of the large intestine. Colitis in dogs can be acute, beginning suddenly and ending relatively quickly; or chronic, lasting for weeks and recurring periodically. Contact your veterinarian if you notice any of the following changes:

  • Blood and/or mucus in the stool
  • Diarrhea
  • Frequent defecation of small amounts of feces

Ask your veterinarian about Purina® Pro Plan® Veterinary Diets

Dental

A pet’s bad breath can be a sign that your dog may be developing dental problems. If ignored, many types of dental conditions are not only irreversible, but can eventually result in tooth loss or cause severe health issues. But how do you know if your dog's bad breath is more than simply annoying? Contact your veterinarian if you notice any of the following changes:

  • Excessive drooling
  • Painful chewing
  • Gum discoloration

Ask your veterinarian about Purina® Pro Plan® Veterinary Diets

Diabetes

Canine diabetes mellitus, or a lack of insulin, is a common hormonal disorder in dogs. It most often affects dogs between the ages of four to fourteen (mean age of 8) and female dogs are more susceptible than males1. Contact your veterinarian if you notice any of the following changes:

  • Extreme hunger
  • Extreme thirst
  • Frequent urination

1. Blackwell’s Five-Minute Veterinary Consult: Canine and Feline. Fifth Edition 2011: 68

Ask your veterinarian about Purina® Pro Plan® Veterinary Diets

Food Sensitivities

Food sensitivity and food intolerance are abnormal reactions to a food or ingredient that is normally considered harmless. Food sensitivity or intolerance can make both you and your dog miserable. Contact your veterinarian if you notice any of the following changes:

  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Excess gas
  • Intense itching or scratching

Ask your veterinarian about Purina® Pro Plan® Veterinary Diets

Gastroenteritis

Gastroenteritis is an inflammation of the lining of the stomach and intestines. Common causes of gastroenteritis in dogs include dietary indiscretion, infectious agents, food sensitivities and parasites. Contact your veterinarian if you notice any of the following changes:

  • Diarrhea
  • Vomiting
  • Loss of appetite
  • Excess gas
  • Weight loss

Gastrointestinal Disorders

Gastrointestinal disease is one of the most common reasons dogs are brought to their veterinarian. Some dog digestive system problems may resolve quickly, but more serious conditions could result in weight loss or dehydration. Contact your veterinarian if you notice any of the following changes:

  • Loss of appetite
  • Excess gas
  • Vomiting
  • Constipation
  • Diarrhea

Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD)

Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is an inflammation of the lining of the intestine. IBD is a chronic condition that may last your dog’s lifetime. The good news is that many cases of IBD can be successfully managed if owners carefully follow feeding and/or medication instructions from their veterinarians. Contact your veterinarian if you notice any of the following changes:

  • Diarrhea
  • Weight loss
  • Vomiting

Kidney

Chronic canine kidney disease is usually a progressive condition, involving the loss of adequate function over a period of months to years. However, medical treatment and dietary management may help and make your dog more comfortable. Contact your veterinarian if you notice any of the following changes:

  • Increased urine volume
  • Increased thirst
  • Decreased appetite
  • Vomiting
  • Unusual breath odor

Ask your veterinarian about Purina® Pro Plan® Veterinary Diets

Obesity

Excess weight is a heavy burden for a pet to bear. When a dog becomes obese, additional stress is placed on the animal’s heart, lungs and joints. If you notice any of the following, ask your veterinarian if you dog may be overweight: 

  • You cannot feel his ribs
  • His belly is rounded when viewed from the side
  • You can’t see a waist when viewed from above

Ask your veterinarian about Purina® Pro Plan® Veterinary Diets

Skin Sensitivities

While true prevalence is unknown, it has been estimated that up to 15 percent of dogs suffer from skin allergies, or allergic dermatitis1. Allergic reactions often lead to skin inflammation, and the most common indication of skin allergies is scratching. These generally occur seasonally, but can extend throughout the year. Contact your veterinarian if you notice any of the following changes:

  • Scratching, rubbing or chewing
  • Redness
  • Hair loss
  • Skin infections
  • Darkened skin tone

1. Blackwell’s Five-Minute Veterinary Consult: Canine and Feline. Fifth Edition 2011: 130

Pancreatitis

Pancreatitis is an inflammation of the pancreas that alters its normal function and structure.  The condition can be acute or chronic and the inflammation can be mild or severe.  The exact cause sometimes remains elusive but several culprits have been directly linked such as dietary indiscretion, trauma, tumors, and certain antibiotics and chemotherapy drugs.  Contact your veterinarian if you notice any of the following changes:

  • Loss of appetite
  • Abdominal pain
  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Fever

Ask your veterinarian about Purina® Pro Plan® Veterinary Diets

Cat Conditions

Cat Conditions

Dental

A pet’s bad breath can be a sign that your cat may be developing dental problems. If ignored, many types of dental conditions are not only irreversible, but can eventually result in tooth loss or cause severe health issues. But how do you know if your cat's bad breath is more than simply annoying? Contact your veterinarian if you notice any of the following changes:

  • Excessive drooling
  • Painful chewing
  • Gum discoloration

Ask your veterinarian about Purina® Pro Plan® Veterinary Diets

Diabetes

Feline diabetes mellitus, or a deficiency of insulin, can be diagnosed at any age. 75% of cats that develop diabetes are between the ages of 8–13. Overweight cats are at a greater risk1Contact your veterinarian if you notice any of the following changes:

  • Extreme hunger
  • Extreme thirst
  • Frequent urination

1. Blackwell’s Five-Minute Veterinary Consult: Canine and Feline. Fifth Edition 2011: 366

Ask your veterinarian about Purina® Pro Plan® Veterinary Diets

Feline Lower Urinary Tract Disease (FLUTD)

Feline Lower Urinary Tract Disease, or FLUTD, is a common condition seen in cats. In some cases, the cats will have an inflammation of the urinary bladder and in other cases crystals or stones form in the urine, which can irritate the lining of the urinary tract. In male cats, crystals or stones can partially or completely block the urine flow. Contact your veterinarian if you notice any of the following changes:

  • Frequent trips to the litter box
  • Crying when urinating
  • Urinating outside the litter box
  • Excessive licking of genital area

Ask your veterinarian about Purina® Pro Plan® Veterinary Diets

Food Sensitivities

Food sensitivities and food intolerance are abnormal reactions to a food or ingredient that is normally considered harmless. Food sensitivity or intolerance can make both you and your cat miserable. Contact your veterinarian if you notice any of the following changes:

  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Excess gas
  • Intense itching or scratching

Ask your veterinarian about Purina® Pro Plan® Veterinary Diets

Gastrointestinal Disorders

Cat digestive system problems are one of the most common reasons cats are brought to their veterinarian. Some cat digestive system problems may resolve quickly, but more serious conditions could result in weight loss or dehydration. Contact your veterinarian if you notice any of the following changes:

  • Loss of appetite
  • Excess gas
  • Vomiting
  • Constipation
  • Diarrhea

Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD)

Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in cats is an inflammation of the lining of the intestine. IBD is a chronic condition that may last your cat’s lifetime. The good news is that many cases of IBD can be successfully managed if owners carefully follow feeding and/or medication instructions from their veterinarians. Contact your veterinarian if you notice any of the following changes:

  • Diarrhea
  • Weight loss
  • Vomiting

Ask your veterinarian about Purina® Pro Plan® Veterinary Diets

Kidney

Chronic feline kidney disease is usually a progressive disorder, involving the loss of adequate function over a period of months to years. However, medical treatment and dietary management may help and make your cat more comfortable. Contact your veterinarian if you notice any of the following changes: 

  • Increased urine volume
  • Increased thirst
  • Decreased appetite
  • Vomiting
  • Unusual breath odor

Ask your veterinarian about Purina® Pro Plan® Veterinary Diets

Obesity

It has been estimated that over 50% of US cats are overweight1. Without proper weight management, cats have a higher risk for diabetes, arthritis and other conditions. Your cat may be overweight if: 

  • You cannot feel her ribs
  • Her belly is rounded when viewed from the side
  • Her waist cannot be seen when viewed from above

1. Association for Pet Obesity Prevention, 2013

Ask your veterinarian about Purina® Pro Plan® Veterinary Diets

Pancreatitis

Pancreatitis is an inflammation of the pancreas that alters its normal function and structure.  The condition can be acute or chronic and the inflammation can be mild or severe.  Unfortunately, the exact cause usually remains elusive but several culprits have been linked such as trauma, tumors, specific parasites and certain antibiotics and chemotherapy drugs.  Also there may be a relationship between inflammatory bowel disease in cats and the development of pancreatitis.  Contact your veterinarian if you notice any of the following changes:

  • Loss of appetite
  • Lethargic
  • Vomiting
  • Abdominal pain
  • Change in body temperature

Ask your veterinarian about Purina® Pro Plan® Veterinary Diets